10 Jaw-Dropping Satellite Images of the Ancient Egyptian Pyramids You’ve Probably Never Seen

The ancient Egyptian pyramids are so massive they can even be spotted from space.

The history behind the Egyptian pyramids is anything short of extraordinary. It is believed that the first Egyptian pyramid was built some 4,700 years ago when royal architect Imhotep stepped onto the scene, completing a proto-pyramid that would become, in the Old Kingdom, a standardized monument.

The ancient Egyptian pyramid achieved its most impressive form with the completion of the Great Pyramid of Giza, several generations after.

But the process between the first stone pyramid in Egypt, the largest pyramid in Egypt, and the last pyramid ever built is history at its best.

The Pyramids of Giza as seen from the International Space Station. Image Credit: Terry Virts / NASA.
The Pyramids of Giza as seen from the International Space Station. Image Credit: Terry Virts / NASA.

Few monuments hold a place in human history as significant as the Egyptian pyramids. Ever since their construction, explorers, academics, and tourists have wondered how such monuments were built. Even during ancient Egyptian times, and one thousand years after the greatest Egyptian pyramid was built, people were left awestruck by what their ancestors had achieved.

An image of the Pyramids at Giza taken by the ESA’s Proba-1 minisatellite. Image Credit: ESA.
An image of the Pyramids at Giza taken by the ESA’s Proba-1 minisatellite. Image Credit: ESA.

This astonishment continues to this date. One cannot dismiss the marvel of engineering that the construction of the Egyptian pyramids represents, and one must acknowledge the massive leap in ancient Egyptian architecture represented in Djoser’s Step Pyramid.

Satellite view of the Pyramids at Giza and Cairo. Image Credit: NASA / Earth Observatory.
Satellite view of the Pyramids at Giza and Cairo. Image Credit: NASA / Earth Observatory.

Without Djoser’s Step Pyramid, the Great Pyramid would probably have never been built. Djoser’s revolutionary monument kick-started a pyramid-building fever in ancient Egypt that lasted through Egypt’s greatest time.

But the journey to building the Great Pyramid does not start 4,500 years ago in the Fourth Dynasty; it traces its origins back all the way to Djoser, Saqqara, and the failed pyramids that followed after Djoser.

A birdlike image of the Pyramids at Giza and the Great Sphinx.
A birdlike image of the Pyramids at Giza and the Great Sphinx.

Although one would expect that after Djoser, a similarly long line of Step Pyramids, would have been built, this was not the case. Although Pharaohs that succeeded Djoser in the Third Dynasty attempted building pyramids, Egypt would not have another pyramid until the start of the Fourth Dynasty, when King Sneferu took the throne of Egypt.

Quickbird image of the Saqqara pyramids. Courtesy of Robert Corrie.
Quickbird image of the Saqqara pyramids. Courtesy of Robert Corrie.

Sneferu is regarded as the greatest pyramid builder in the history of Egypt, successfully completing three “Great” Pyramids: the Pyramid at Meidum, and the Bent and Red Pyramid at Dahshur.

Satellite view of the Pyramids at Giza. Image Credit: JAXA.
Satellite view of the Pyramids at Giza. Image Credit: JAXA.

This means that the truly gigantic stone pyramids of Egypt were built over the course of three generations; Sneferu, Khufu, and Khafre, father, son, and grandson.

If Sneferu did complete the pyramid at Meidum, and his pyramids at Dahshur, then his pyramids alone contain more than 2.5 million cu. Meters of stone. This is astonishing since all other pyramids combined of the Egyptian kinds contain no more than 41 percent of the total mass of the pyramids built by Sneferu.

The Pyramids at Dahshur as seen from space. Image Credit: NASA.
The Pyramids at Dahshur as seen from space. Image Credit: NASA.

Although Menkaure’s pyramid was built with multi-ton stones, the total volume of his pyramid is less than the mass of Djoser’s Step Pyramid. Therefore, the fourth Dynasty of ancient Egypt is regarded as the most flourishing pyramid building dynasty in the history of Egypt.

Notice how Khufu's pyramid (to the right) has eight sides instead of four. Shutterstock.
Notice how Khufu’s pyramid (to the right) has eight sides instead of four. Shutterstock.

In the 5th and 6th dynasties, Pharaohs still built pyramids but on a much smaller scale, and in lesser forms. Pyramids were built with smaller stones and a core of stone rubble fill. Therefore, the 5th and 6th dynasty pyramids are inferior monuments.

Stunning view of the Pyramids at Giza as seen from the International Space Station. Image Credit: NASA / Flickr.
Stunning view of the Pyramids at Giza, as seen from the International Space Station. Image Credit: NASA / Flickr.

As revealed by Lehner (p15), pyramid building almost stopped during the Frist Intermediate Period, when unified rule gave way to rival principalities. Pyramid construction was resumed in the Middle Kingdom.

A view of the Pyramids at Dahshur from space. Image credit: Thomas Pesquet, ESA.
A view of the Pyramids at Dahshur from space. Image credit: Thomas Pesquet, ESA.

These pyramids, however, were even lesser and built with a core of small and broken stone in casemate or retaining walls. Later pyramids were built with a core made of mudbrick.

Sizes of pyramids were at this time no longer standardized as those that were built in the Old Kingdom. Entrances were no longer opened consistently from the north side of the pyramid, signalizing that the pyramid, as a monument, was losing importance among the rulers.

Eventually, and during the New Kingdom, pyramids were no longer a “thing”, and Egyptologists say that the Pharaohs built their tombs in a communal royal burial ground; the Valley of the Kings near Thebes.

It still fascinates me as to why kings after Menkaure decided on building lesser pyramids, and why they decided to expand the size of temples while reducing the size of pyramids.

Eventually, the Nubian kings—in present-day Sudan—mirrored many facets of the Egyptian culture, and with them the Pyramids. Some 800 years after the successful completion of the last Egyptian pyramid, the Nubian kings erected their own version of pyramids, albeit on a smaller scale.

In the course of one thousand years, the rules of the Kingdom of Napata—720BC—and the Kingdom of Meroe—AD350—built around 200 pyramids, making Sudan the African country with the most number of pyramids with nearly twice as many as in Egypt.

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