10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About the First Human To Set Foot On the Moon

Neil was the first human to view Earth from the moon’s surface. He mentioned that he could easily hold up his thumb and block out the Earth while standing there.

Neil Armstrong was NASA’s most popular and reputable astronaut. Why, though? He is famous for being the first person to walk on the moon. Moreover, Armstrong bagged numerous titles and achievements throughout his career. He also flew on NASA’s Gemini 8 mission in 1966. Neil was born to fly and accomplish his goals. His passion and motivation eventually led him to the moon. 

Neil Armstrong sits in the lunar module after a historic moonwalk. Source: NASA
Neil Armstrong sits in the lunar module after a historic moonwalk. Source: NASA

Here are ten interesting facts regarding Neil Armstrong and his life as a NASA astronaut: 

1) Neil Armstrong was the first human to walk on the moon:

Neil Armstrong was the first person to walk on the moon during the NASA Apollo 11 mission on 20th of July, 1969. He successfully completed the mission alongside co-pilots Edwin E. Aldrin and Michael Collins.

2) Neil received his first flying license at the age of 16:

Neil grew up in rural America and loved to learn all about aeroplanes and space. He received his first flying license when he was just 16 years old. He didn’t even have a driving license back when he cleared his flying exam. 

3) Over a billion people watched him landing on the moon:

Over a billion people watched him stepping on the moon. When Neil stepped on the moon for the first time, he said the now-famous line, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

4) Neil managed to walk 60 meters on the moon:

As per records, Armstrong walked a distance of about 60 meters on the surface of the moon. He explored as much as he could and eventually returned to his spaceship. He said that this was his one chance to make a difference in the world. 

5) Neil Armstrong retired in around 1971:

Armstrong retired from NASA in around 1971. However, he remained active in the aerospace community, but he chose to stay out of the public light. Also, Neil Armstrong died in August 25, 2012, at the age of 82.

6) Neil was a naval aviator before becoming an astronaut:

Neil Armstrong was a naval aviator from 1949 to 1952 and actively participated in the Korean War. Moreover, he did his bachelors in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University in 1955. He, later on, completed his master’s degree from the University of Southern California in 1970.

7) Armstrong was initially selected as a test pilot for NASA:

Armstrong became a test pilot for NASA and flew the X-15, a rocket-powered, missile-shaped aircraft that tested the limits of high-altitude flight. As per various records, Neil was the best of the lot and flew over 200 jets, gliders and helicopters throughout his career. 

8) Neil’s rocket, Saturn V, was as tall as a 36-storey building: 

The spacecraft that launched Neil and his crew into space is known as the Saturn V rocket. It was as tall as a 36-storey building. Moreover, the launch control was located 3.5 miles from the launch pad itself.

9) He was the first human to view earth from the lunar surface:

Yes, Neil was the first human to view Earth from the moon’s surface. Neil mentioned that he could easily hold up his thumb and block out the Earth while standing there. He further said that the Moon felt lonely, but being there made him realise how beautiful our home is.

10) Neil Armstrong won various awards after his return to the earth:

Neil won the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969, the Hubbard Medal in 1970, the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 1978, and the General James E. Hill Lifetime Space Achievement Award. 

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