72 Years After Roswell: Here’s How the UFO Phenomenon Changed

The UFO phenomenon is no longer a conspiracy, but a subject worthy of serious scientific study.

July 8 marked the 72nd anniversary of the Roswell Case; the day when an alleged alien ship (Flying Saucer) crashed near the city of Roswell in New Mexico.

In particular, on July 8, 1947, the United States Army had announced in the newspapers the “recovery” of the remains of a “flying saucer” on a ranch near Roswell.

The communication officer at the Roswell Army air base, Walter Haut, issued a press release writing that the 509 Operations Group personnel had recovered a “flying disc,” which had crashed on a ranch near Roswell.

Mac Brazel, a farmer from New Mexico, discovers scattered remains on his ranch near Corona, New Mexico, and on July 5 reports what he had found to the authorities.

After the release of the military communique on July 8, and the visit to the area of a military high command, the version abruptly changes and the facts are atrophied to the impact of a large military balloon belonging to Project Mogul.

Several subsequent military reports seemed to corroborate this version.

An artists rendering of an extraterrestrial being. Shutterstock.

Roswell Case

Eventually, people forgot about the case altogether and until 1978, the Roswell incident received little attention.

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That changed when UFO researchers Stanton T. Friedman and William L. Moore compared the results of a series of interviews that each had conducted separately.

The official version of the crashed balloon theory was reconsidered and people started taking into consideration the possibility that the Army had actually recovered highly advanced technology from a crashed alien spaceship, together with ‘various’ corpses, of the alleged extraterrestrial beings.

Edgar Mitchell’s claims

Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell, although not a direct witness, has also stated numerous times that Roswell was a true UFO case, based on his high-level contacts within the government. “I have seen the secret UFO files, and there is no doubt that there was contact with extraterrestrials,” he said.

Interestingly Mitchell also believed that there is a government organization that is parallel and independent to the government that conducts experiments with extraterrestrial technology “and that is why all these incidents cannot be brought to light”.

Mitchell died in 2016 without having provided any evidence to corroborate his claims.

Birth of UFOlogy

The Roswell UFO case is widely recognized as the birth of modern ufology and has led to numerous debates, theories, and speculations about the existence of extraterrestrial life that many others consider totally unfounded.

Those who remain skeptical about the alleged flying saucer that crashed in Roswell are keen to accept the ‘revised, official version’ that tells us that instead of an aliens spaceship, what had crashed on the Roswell farm was actually a  secret military weather balloon.

The phenomenon has had a great weight in popular culture and is mentioned in numerous works of fiction, as well as in documentaries.

But despite Roswell being the starting point of modern ufology, it wasn’t the first recorded sighting in the United States.

On February 24, 1942, the Famous Battle of L.A. took place, and many people claim that the military had shot at a UFO that night.

But if you are willing to dig deeper in historical records, you will find that evidence of UFOs can be traced back to antiquity and classical antiquity.

An ancient Egyptian text dubbed the Tulli Papyrus, dated to circa 1440 BC describes ‘fiery disks’ in the sky above Egypt.

Artists illustration of a UFO above a city. Shutterstock.
Shutterstock.

After Roswell

Years following Roswell were turbulent for anyone serious in Ufology.

In fact, up until recently, it was all just a giant conspiracy.

Efforts to study the subject in a serious way have failed miserably, mostly because people find something very hard to believe if it’s not in the mainstream news.

That, of course, was until piece by piece, and very slowly, details of UFO sightings started being filtered to the public.

It was as if people were being prepared for the motherlode.

Numerous UFO sightings occurred after Roswell. Some of them even made a stronger case for alien technology than the alleged flying saucer that crashed in New Mexico.

But again, the evidence was tucked away, until it was eventually forgotten altogether.

One stunning case that occurred after Roswell was the Phoenix Lights: a series of widely sighted unidentified flying objects or UFOs observed in the skies over the U.S. states of Arizona, Nevada, and the Mexican state of Sonora on March 13, 1997.

UFO Disclosure

For the past five years, the UFO phenomenon has been actively pushed to the masses. As much as 95 percent of all Americans have at least heard or read something about Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs), and as much as 57 percent believe they are real.

Countless declassified documents detailing the Government involvement in UFOs have surfaced, and many people started coming forward with their specific story on UFOs.

Astronauts, Military Officials, and Highly ranked Government officials spoke out about a subject that for years was classified a conspiracy.

Videos recorded by Navy Pilots chasing UFOs were made available to the public, and all of a sudden, the UFO phenomenon was no longer a conspiracy, but a subject worthy of study and attention.

We learned about the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), and how the government was actually very interested in UFOs for quite some time, despite contrary beliefs.

We learned that this project was well funded, and its goal was to study unexplained aerial phenomena. The project generated a stunning 490-page report that documents alleged worldwide UFO sightings over several decades.

As revealed by the New York Times in 2017, AATIP was headed by Luis Elizondo, who resigned from the Pentagon in October 2017 to protest government secrecy and opposition to the investigation, stating in a resignation letter to US Defense Secretary James Mattis that the program was not being taken seriously.

The AATIP revelation helped the “To the Stars Academy of Arts & Science,” a non-profit organization committed to studying the UFO phenomenon with the best available tools.

Founded in 2015 by former Blink 182 musician Tom DeLonge, the organization became quickly recognized as a pioneer in the study of UFO sightings and alien life.

Artists illustration of a UFO following an Airplane. Shutterstock.
Artists illustration of a UFO following an Airplane. Shutterstock.

The push for disclosure also helped reveal the CIA’s role in the study of UFOs between 1947 and 1990.

But during the years, and without giving the rest of the world any hints, the Government conducted a number of studies on UFOS. Project Blue Book was one such program, but not the first.

Project Blue Book started in 1952, the third study of its kind, following projects Sign (1947) and Grudge (1949). The goal of all three projects was clear: the determine whether on nor UFOs posed a direct threat to national security, and to scientifically analyze UFO data.

The projects eventually yielded thousands of reports and files. However, the Condon Report of 1968 went on to conclude that there was nothing ‘anomalous’ about UFOs. The Condon Report was endorsed by the National Academy of Scientists.

Interestingly, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) disagreed with Condon’s conclusion, explained that as many as thirty percent of cases studied remained unexplained and that scientific benefit might be gained by continued study.

Project Blue Book resulted in 12,618 UFO reports and concluded that most of them were misidentifications of natural phenomena (clouds, stars, etc.) or conventional aircraft.

This comes as a surprise, known that after 1968, the government continued to actively monitor UFOs and study them.

As of 2019, the UFO phenomenon is no longer a conspiracy, but a subject worthy of serious scientific study.