Advertisement

A Dragon-Shaped Aurora has Just Been Photographed in Iceland

Have you ever seen a dragon in the sky? Although real flying dragons don't exist, a huge dragon-shaped aurora developed in the sky over Iceland earlier this month.

Although flying dragons may not exist, an aurora with the form of this mythical being has recently appeared in the skies of Iceland.

Advertisement

The aurora was caused by a hole in the Sun’s corona that expelled charged particles into a solar wind that followed a changing interplanetary magnetic field to Earth’s magnetosphere.

Dragon Aurora over Iceland Image Credit & Copyright: Jingyi Zhang & Wang Zheng.
Dragon Aurora over Iceland. Image Credit & Copyright: Jingyi Zhang & Wang Zheng.

As some of those particles then struck Earth’s atmosphere, they excited atoms which subsequently emitted light: Aurora.

This iconic display was so enthralling that the photographer’s mother ran out to see it and was captured in the foreground.

No sunspots have appeared on the Sun so far in February, making the multiple days of picturesque auroral activity this month somewhat surprising.

Advertisement

Auroras are not just something that happen on Earth.

If a planet has an atmosphere and magnetic field, they probably have auroras.

These swirls of red light are an aurora on the south pole of Saturn. Image courtesy of NASA/ESA/STScI/A. Schaller.

We’ve seen amazing auroras on Jupiter and Saturn.