Ancient Rock Art Dating Back to Early Stone Age Discovered in Turkey

Ancient Rock Art Dating Back to Early Stone Age Discovered in Turkey

Fishermen in Turkey have come across an archaeological discovery of epic proportions. They have discovered cave drawings which are believed to date back to the early Stone Age after water from the Ataturk dam was drained.

The area that features the drawing stretches 8 meters in length, and 70 centimeters wide. In order for the ancient drawings to be revealed, water levels had to drop between 32 to 49ft.

The find marks an unprecedented discovery.

Speaking about the cave paintings, the director of the country’s Adiyaman Museum, Mehmet Alkan said: “the drawings included human and animal figures – as well as notable scenes of hunters chasing prey.”

The cave paintings are thought to have been created with rudimentary carving methods thousands of years ago.

The discovery was made in the district of the southeastern Adiyaman province.

The director of the country's Adiyaman Museum Alkan exploring the ancient drawings. Image Credit: Karar.
The director of the country’s Adiyaman Museum Alkan exploring the ancient drawings. Image Credit: Karar.

The drawings say experts are well preserved and in good condition.

One of the most notorious scenes illustrates men with horses chasing down a mouse-deer.

Furthermore, other scenes appear to depict a hunting party going after wild goats.

The newly found cave drawings were found on a massive rock face eight meters long, 70 centimeters wide.

A plethora of different rock art has recently been revealed in Turkey. Image Credit: Karar.
A plethora of different rock art has recently been revealed in Turkey. Image Credit: Karar.

According to Alkan, the recently found cave drawings could date back from the Paleolithic era.

This means that the stunning rock art could be up 2.6 million years old.

The Paleolithic is a period in human prehistory most notable by the development of stone tools that covers circa 95% of human technological prehistory. The period extends from the earliest known use of stone tools by hominins some 3.3 million years ago, to the end of the Pleistocene circa 11,650 before the present era.

“There will be detailed work from now on. If not identified before, then we will begin the registration process,” explained Alkan.

“The area was unveiled after dam waters decreased by 32 to 49ft (10 to 15 meters),’ he added.

Thankfully the dam waters did not erode or damage the ancient drawings.

However, it remains a mystery as to what will happen with an archaeological site of this importance after the water of the dam rise again, and rise they will.

According to Karar, it is thought that the site where the paintings were found was a religious area.

The rock art is located in the city of Adiyaman, which happens to already be one of the country’s most notorious tourist spots, including sites such as Mount Nemrut.

By visiting Adiyaman you will not only be able to enjoy in the history of the area, but you will have an opportunity to immerse yourself in the beautiful sunrises and sunsets.

Aidmayan is also Turkey’s fastest growing city.

Source: Karar

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