Archaeologists Discover Long-Lost Relic of the Great Wall in China

The recently found structures extend for 300 meters between two hills in a mountainous area, with altitudes ranging between 1,592 and 1,625 meters above sea level.

A team of archaeologists has discovered previously unknown ruins of the Great Wall of China in the mountains located in the north of the country.

Excavations in North China’s Hebei province have revealed a new Great Wall Relic believed to have been erected during the Ming Dynasty, (1368-1644) to protect against northern invaders.

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According to local experts, the design of the relic uncovered in the city of Wu’an features structure and architectural design elements similar to those discovered in the same area by archeologists in 2007.

This has led scientists to believe that they were part of the same defense system.

As explained by XinhuaNet, the recently found structures extend for 300 meters between two hills in a mountainous area, with altitudes ranging between 1,592 and 1,625 meters above sea level.

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Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of draining holes and defense platforms at the site.

The Great Wall of China is an old Chinese fortification constructed and reconstructed between the third century B.C. and the Ming Dynasty to protect the northern border of the Chinese Empire during the successive imperial dynasties of the attacks of nomadic Xiongnu of Mongolia and Manchuria.

The Great Wall is, in fact, a series of interconnected walls, and not a single structure.

Chinese archaeologists suspect that there are many similar ‘hidden’ parts of the great Wall tucked away in the hills surrounding the Great Wall of China.

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