Archaeologists Find Long Lost Ancient City in Greece

The city is believed to have been settled by Trojan captives after the war of Troy.

A city that was thought to be only a myth has recently been found in Greece.

According to the Greek Culture Ministry, archaeologists have located the first tangible pieces of evidence of a long lost ancient city, settled by Trojan captives after the war of Troy.

The discovery includes the city walls as well as clay, marble and stone floors of ancient buildings, and household pottery fragments. Image Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture.
The discovery includes the city walls as well as clay, marble and stone floors of ancient buildings, and household pottery fragments. Image Credit: Greek Ministry of Culture.

According to statements from the ministry, archeological excavations that took place from September to October of this year in the Greek region of Peleponnese resulted in the discovery of the ruins of the ancient city of Tenea, which until know was only present in ancient texts.

Archaeologists excavated walls, clay, marble and stone floors of buildings, and countless fragments of household pottery. Experts also recovered more than 200 coins which are believed to date back to the fourth century B.C.

Among the treasure trove of items, archeologists made an unusual discovery.

Experts excavated a pottery jar filled with the remains of two human fetuses in the foundation of one of the buildings.

This discovery is strange since the ancient Greek were known for burying their dead in an organized cemetery that was located outside the city.

The ancient city of Tenea was mentioned in a number of ancient writings.

Strabo, a Greek geographer, philosopher, and historian who lived in Asia Minor during the transitional period of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire wrote about the city:

Tenea, also, is in Korinthia, and in it is a temple of the Apollon Teneatos; and it is said that most of the colonists who accompanied Archias, the leader of the colonists to Syracuse, set out from there and that afterward Tenea prospered more than the other settlements, and finally even had a government of its own, and, revolting from the Corinthians, joined the Romans, and endured after the destruction of Corinth. And it seems, also, that there is a kinship between the peoples of Tenedos and Tenea, through Tennes the son of Kyknos, as Aristotle says; and the similarity in the worship of Apollon among the two peoples affords strong indications of such kinship. Strabo, (8.6.22)

Experts currently know very little about the ancient city of Tenea.

We know that several ancient references link the ancient city with Troy and to its citizens who are believed to have been the bulk of the Greek colonists who founded the city of Syracuse in Sicily.

Lead archaeologist Elena Korka explained that more information about the city should emerge during future excavations, which will continue over the coming years.

“(The city) had distinctive pottery shapes with eastern influences, maintained contacts with both east and west … and had its own way of thinking, which, to the extent that it could, shaped its own policies,” she explained.

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