Check Out 5 Stunning Images of Octobers Rare Full Blue Moon

My Images of the October Full Blue Moon, a cosmic event that won't repeat until 2039.

I have become addicted to photographing the stars and the Moon. It is a soothing experience and relaxes me, taking me away from a busy day. I love setting up shop at night, preferably somewhere quiet, far from city lights, as I observe the stars through my telescope or camera.

Octobers was an amazing month for astrophotography and sky gazing, with various cosmic events offering us a lot to see. The highlight of the month, at least for me, was the Full Blue Moon.

The rare Blue Moon that gave Halloween that extra spooky feeling was special because it was the first in 76 years, and it won’t repeat until the year 2039. This is because the Halloween Full Moon was visible for most time zones on Earth making it an event that has not occurred since the year 1944.

The term blue moon is used to designate the second full moon that takes place in a single calendar month. But as revealed by space.com, Blue Moons are relatively rare since they occur every two-and-a-half-years or so.

October’s Blue Moon can also be called a hunter’s moon, which is a traditional name given to the first Full Moon after the Harvest Moon, as per the Farmers’ Almanac.

It is noteworthy to explain that the present definition of “blue Moon” is a misinterpretation of the original one. As per space.com, the term once referred to the third full moon of a season—whether this is Summer, Spring, Fall, or winter—that sported four full Moons instead of the usual three.

As you are probably well aware, the term has nothing to do with the actual color of the Moon, which does NOT change in color. We can perceive the moon’s brightly illuminated surface sometimes as having a different color, sometimes it can paper blueish, but this is due to the scattering of light by dust or other particles within our planet’s atmosphere.

I took this image of the Moon on October 31, 2020. Although it wasn't a cloudless night, I still managed to take an opportune snap of the brightly illuminated lunar surface. The photograph was taken with a Nikon P1000 camera. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.
I took this image of the Moon on October 31, 2020. Although it wasn’t a cloudless night, I still managed to take an opportune snap of the brightly illuminated lunar surface. The photograph was taken with a Nikon P1000 camera. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.

There is something special and entirely soothing in photographing the Moon. Seeing the brightly illuminated surface is a wonderful experience that cannot be described in words.

Observing the Moon for moments is hypnotic. In fact, the entire experience of photographing the moon—and the stars—takes me to places I can’t describe with words. To me, photographing the stars is special, its therapeutic; it is entirely beautifully relaxing.

This close-up image of the lunar surface appears blurry mostly due to the weather conditions of the day I took the image. It was a bit cloudy and was difficult to get a clear shot of the surface. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.
This close-up image of the lunar surface appears blurry, mostly due to the weather conditions of the day I took the image. It was a bit cloudy, and it was difficult to get a clear shot of the surface. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.
One of the clearest images of the lunar surface I managed to take on October 31, 2020. This image, as well as all other images in this article were taken from the Northern Hemisphere. This image was taken without the aid of a telescope, using only a Nikon P1000 camera. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.
One of the clearest images of the lunar surface I managed to take on October 31, 2020. This image and all other images in this article were taken from the Northern Hemisphere. This image was taken without the aid of a telescope, using only a Nikon P1000 camera. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.
This is one of my favorite images of the moon ever taken. I enjoyed the image and how it looks after I adjusted the colors in LR. The photograph was taken with the Nikon P1000 camera, which has a mind-boggling zoom that not only allows observing the lunar surface in crisp detail, but also observing Jupiter, Saturn, and some of their moons. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.
This is one of my favorite images of the moon ever taken. I enjoyed the image and how it looks after I adjusted the colors in LR. The photograph was taken with the Nikon P1000 camera, which has a mind-boggling zoom that allows observing the lunar surface in crisp detail and observing Jupiter, Saturn, and some of their moons. Image Credit: Ivan Petricevic.

You can follow me on Flickr and see the photographs I take.

Written by Ivan Petricevic

I've been writing passionately about ancient civilizations, history, alien life, and various other subjects for more than eight years. You may have seen me appear on Discovery Channel's What On Earth series, History Channel's Ancient Aliens, and Gaia's Ancient Civilizations among others.

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