Dozens of Previously Unknown Monuments Discovered Near Newgrange

Archaeologists have reported discovering up to 40 new ancient Irish monuments near Newgrange.

In a huge archeological discovery, dozens of previously unknown ancient monuments have been found near Newgrange, the most famous ancient archaeological site in Ireland, thanks to the ‘Boyne to Brodgar’ project through which researchers are studying the connections between Neolithic sites in the Boyne Valley and the Orkney Islands.

Among the numerous discoveries made by experts, researchers identified a spectacular monument that which was built to align with the dawn of the winter solstice. Archaeologists say that the monuments probably date back to the Neolithic period (4000 BC), to the Bronze Age (2500 BC) and the High Middle Ages.

The researchers argue that the recently discovered monument aligned with the dawn of the winter solstice is about 200 to 300 years more modern than the famous tomb of the Stone Age passage in Newgrange, dated around 3,200 BC. C., and was discovered in a field a few meters from the famous site.

Image of Newgrange at night. Shutterstock.
Shutterstock.

Dr. Steve Davis and a and colleagues from the University College School of Archeology in Dublin used a large-scale geophysical imaging system to reveal the new monuments as part of a joint project with the Romano-Germanic Commission.

“These methods have in the last few years changed our understanding of the Brú na Bóinne landscape beyond all recognition,” Dr. Davis revealed in a statement.

Brú na Bóinne is located in an area in County Meath, home to some of the world’s most important prehistoric landscapes. It was precisely there where the ancients erected the Megalithic passage graves of Knowth, Newgrange, and Dowth. But the area, in general, is home to more than 90 ancient monuments believed to have been erected during the Neolithic. The monument was constructed using approximately 200,000 tons of rock and other materials. It is 85 meters (279 ft) wide at its widest point.

The entrance to Newgrange. Shutterstock.
Shutterstock.