Earth’s Magnetic Pole Continues Wandering Mysteriously Towards Siberia

Since its first formal discovery in 1831, the north magnetic pole has moved around 1,400 miles (2,250 km

According to the latest reports by the World Magnetic Model (WMM), our planet’s magnetic pole continues its mysterious journey towards Siberia.

Something strange is going on at the top of the world. Our planet’s north magnetic pole has been moving away from Canada and heading towards Siberia, driven by liquid iron within the planet’s core.


The location of the magnetic north pole, whose coordinates are crucial for navigation systems, continues its drift towards Siberia, although, at a rate not as accelerated as in recent years, new models have recently revealed.

This is according to the latest report of the World Magnetic Model (WMM), one of the key tools that help model the change in the Earth’s magnetic field.

Developed by the NOAA and the British Geological Survey, the WMM is a representation of the planet’s magnetic field that provides reliable accuracy to compasses.

“The WMM 2020 forecasts that the north magnetic pole will continue to drift towards Russia, although at a slowly decreasing speed, up to about 40 km per year compared to the average speed of 55 km in the last twenty years,” according to a statement from NOAA.

The new model is expected to remain in effect until the year 2025 when a new updated is expected.

The latest model of the WMM includes “Blackout Zones” around the magnetic poles.

In January of 2019, the off behavior of the magnetic north pole forced scientists to issue an “emergency update” of the model that helps global navigation.

A view of the movement of the Magnetic North of our planet. Image Credit: World Data Center for Geomagnetism/Kyoto Univ.
A view of the movement of the Magnetic North of our planet. Image Credit: World Data Center for Geomagnetism/Kyoto Univ.

Since its first formal discovery in 1831, the north magnetic pole has moved around 1,400 miles (2,250 km). This wandering has been usually quite slow, enabling scientists to keep track of its location fairly easily.

However, for reasons that remain unclear, since the turn of the century, this speed has increased.

The WMM is used by the military not only for undersea and aircraft navigation, but also for parachute deployment, and more. It is also used by NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Forest Service. Other organizations also use the WMM for surveying and mapping, satellite/antenna tracking, and air traffic management.

Scientists are working to learn why the magnetic field is shifting so dramatically. Geomagnetic pulses, like the one that occurred in 2016, might be traced back to ‘hydromagnetic’ waves emanating from deep in the planet’s core.

The swift motion of the north magnetic pole could be linked to a high-speed jet of liquid iron beneath located Canada.

Although there is much to be learned about our planet’s magnetic north pole, experts believe that the location of the north magnetic pole seems to be governed by two large-scale magnetic field patches, one below Canada and one below Siberia. As things are standing no, the Siberian patch is winning the competition.

In other words, this means that our planet’s top geomagnetists will have a lot to keep them busy in the foreseeable future as the magnetic north pole continues its mysterious journey.

Back to top button
Close
Close