Hubble Snaps Massive Cosmic Panorama With 12,000 ‘Fire and Fury Galaxies

According to NASA, the newly released image features 12,000 star-forming galaxies. 

When it comes down to cosmic panorama images, this is one of the most amazing images eve snapped.

NAS has recently revealed another stunning masterpiece photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. According to NASA, the newly released image features 12,000 star-forming galaxies. 

The space agency has explained that the image is “the largest panoramic view of the fire and fury of star birth in the distant universe.”

This photo encompasses a sea of approximately 15,000 galaxies — 12,000 of which are star-forming — widely distributed in time and space. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales).
This photo encompasses a sea of approximately 15,000 galaxies — 12,000 of which are star-forming — widely distributed in time and space. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, P. Oesch (University of Geneva), and M. Montes (University of New South Wales).

The image, which uses ultraviolet light to create a never-before-seen area of the sky opens up a new window on the ever-evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years back to the cosmos’ busiest star-forming period, which happened about 3 billion years after the big bang.

“Hubble’s ultraviolet vision opens up a new window on the evolving universe, tracking the birth of stars over the last 11 billion years up to the busiest star-forming period in the cosmos, which happened about three billion years after the big bang,” NASA writes in the accompanying description of the image published on their website.

Until now, ultraviolet light has been the missing piece of the cosmic puzzle. However, combined with data in infrared and visible light from Hubble and other space- and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have managed to assemble the most comprehensive portrait yet of the universe’s evolutionary history.

“Combined with data in infrared and visible light from Hubble and other space- and ground-based telescopes, astronomers have assembled the most comprehensive portrait yet of the universe’s evolutionary history.”

The program, called the Hubble Deep UV (HDUV) Legacy Survey, extends and builds on the previous Hubble multi-wavelength data in the CANDELS-Deep (Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey) fields within the central part of the GOODS (Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey) fields.

This image is a portion of the GOODS-North field, which is located in the northern constellation Ursa Major.

The image is significant because it is 14 times the area of the Hubble Ultraviolet Ultra Deep Field released in 2014.

Source
NASA
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