This is a view of NGC 628 as seen by the James Webb Space Telescope. Image Credit: Color composite, Gabriel Brammer (Cosmic Dawn Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen); raw data, Janice Lee et al. and the PHANGS-JWST collaboration.)

James Webb Telescope Captures Stunning View of Distant Galaxy

The James Webb Space Telescope has captured another stunning image in deep space. This time, the state-of-the-art telescope turned towards NGC 628 and revealed a swirling, dusty skeleton more like something from a Marvel movie than a spiral galaxy.

The monstrous people spiral of a nearby galaxy is just one of many Webb telescope images to come over the coming days, weeks, and years.

The new James Webb Space Telescope image shows NGC 628 as a swirling, dusty skeleton more like something from a Marvel movie than a spiral galaxy.

In an interview with The Independent, Gabriel Brammer, one of the researchers at the Cosmic Dawn Center at the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen, said the galaxy looks like our own Milky Way.

“You can see all these knots of individual stars forming; individual supernovae have gone off and really study that in detail, he told the Independent.

https://twitter.com/gbrammer/status/1548958241878581248

While the spiral arms of NGC 628 have been photographed before, Hubble Space Telescope images show them to be quite different from the purple spiral structure captured by Webb’s mid-infrared camera.

Using Hubble or ground-based telescopes, you see blue stars, red stars, spiral arms, and dust lanes when you look at this galaxy, Dr. Brammer said.

This image shows M74 as observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Spitzer Nearby Galaxy Survey in the infrared. 3.6 micrometre emission from stars is represented by the blue colors. Green and red represent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dust emission at 5.8 and 8.0 micrometres, respectively. Image Credit: NASA.
This image shows M74 as the Spitzer Space Telescope observed as part of the Spitzer Nearby Galaxy Survey in the infrared. The blue colors represent 3.6-micrometre emission from stars. Green and red represent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dust emission at 5.8 and 8.0 micrometers, respectively. Image Credit: NASA.

Written by Ivan Petricevic

I've been writing passionately about ancient civilizations, history, alien life, and various other subjects for more than eight years. You may have seen me appear on Discovery Channel's What On Earth series, History Channel's Ancient Aliens, and Gaia's Ancient Civilizations among others.

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