NASA’s Lunar Orbiter Snaps Images of Chang’e 4 Landing Site on the Far Side of the Moon

In a historic landing, China became the first nation to successfully land a spacecraft (Chang’e 4) on the far side of the moon on January 3.

Ever since touching down on the far side of the moon the lander, as well as the Yutu-2 rover has been sending back images and scientific data to mission specialists on Earth.

Area around lander enlarged by a factor of two relative to the native pixel scale; the bright speck between two arrows is the lander. The large crater in the center (just right and below arrows) is about 1440 feet (440 meters) across. Credt: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University.
The area around lander enlarged by a factor of two, relative to the native pixel scale; the bright speck between two arrows is the lander. The large crater in the center (just right and below arrows) is about 1440 feet (440 meters) across. Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University.

However, all the images they’ve been sending were from Chang’es own point of view.

Now, NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has spotted (for the first time) the lander sitting tight in its landing site inside the lunar Von Kármán crater, on the far side of the moon.

The lander is extremly hard to spot in the images published by NASA.

The Chinese lander is barely seen in this image taken by NASA's MRO. Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University.
The Chinese lander is barely seen in this image taken by NASA’s MRO. Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University.

In fact, as noted by scientists, the first ‘external’ view of the Chang’e 4 lander makes up only two pixels in the long-range shot.

The MRO was traveling the moon at 330 kilometers from the landing site when it took the image.

To better spot the Chinese lander, NASA has annotated the photo with arrows in an effort to help viewers better spot it.

Via
NASA
Back to top button

Adblock detected :(

Hi, we understand that enjoy and Ad-free experience while surfing the internet, however, many sites, including ours, depend on ads to continue operating and producing the content you are reading now. Please consider turning off Ad-Block. We are committed to reducing the number of ads shown on the site.