A C-class solar flare like the ones recorded during the peak of solar activity last week. Credit: NASA/SDO

Solar flare disrupts US radio

Solar flares range in classification from A to X. The numbers within each letter signify the exact intensity, with X1.5 being one of the strongest.

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An X1.5 class solar flare has unleashed havoc on radio communication across the United States on August 7.

Originating from a region of spots at the edge of the solar disk, this particular flare highlights the Sun’s increasing activity and what we may expect in the coming years.

Understanding Solar Flares and Their Classification

The categorization of solar flares involves a scale running from A to X, with numbers further denoting their specific intensity. As one of the most potent energy releases, an X1.5 class flare carries significant implications for our planet’s technology.

Solar flares range in classification from A to X. The numbers within each letter signify the exact intensity, with X1.5 being one of the strongest.

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Effects on Technology and Earth’s Atmosphere

A flare of this magnitude doesn’t only affect radio waves. It can also impact satellite navigation systems and various technologies reliant on electromagnetic signals. Moreover, it can have profound effects on the upper atmosphere and surrounding ionospheric layers.

The recent X1.5 class flare disrupted radio communication, satellite navigation, and altered conditions in the Earth’s upper atmospheric layers.

Recent Solar Behavior and Predictions

The Space Weather Prediction Center reported the incident on August 7, noting another slightly more potent flare, X1.6, just two days prior. The increasing activity is expected to continue, culminating in the peak of the Sun’s 11-year cycle in July 2025.

Two powerful flares within days, and the anticipation of more to come, mark a period of growing solar activity leading to the peak of the Sun’s 11-year cycle.

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With the sunspot responsible for the radio blackout already out of our view, attention turns to the future. The recent disruption serves as a reminder of our connection to celestial activity and a warning to prepare for more such incidents as we approach the peak of the Sun’s cycle.

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Written by Ivan Petricevic

I've been writing passionately about ancient civilizations, history, alien life, and various other subjects for more than eight years. You may have seen me appear on Discovery Channel's What On Earth series, History Channel's Ancient Aliens, and Gaia's Ancient Civilizations among others.

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