We Landed on Venus Exactly 45 Years Ago; Here Are The Surface Images

The lander of the Soviet space mission Venera-9 made a soft landing on the surface of Venus on October 22, 1975, transmitting the first images of its surface.

Not long ago, the world was shaken by a scientific study that had “claimed” researchers had found possible traces of alien life in the atmosphere of Venus, a planet on which mankind landed a probe exactly 45 years ago.

Although life—as we know it—can not exist on the surface of Venus, the conditions are very different at higher altitudes. A study published in September 2020 by the Royal Astronomical Society revealed that the existence of phosphine molecules in the atmosphere of Venus—specifically at altitudes of around 50 kilometers above the surface—likely point towards microbial life; microbial alien life.

“Finding phosphine on Venus was an unexpected bonus! The discovery raises many questions, such as how any organisms could survive,” scientists revealed in September.

Although this discovery has been called into question since then, and numerous scientists remain skeptical about the findings, Venus is currently the planet closest to Earth, in terms of life, despite being inhospitable to life forms as those that exist on Earth.

Of course, life on Earth and life on distant could be very different, and this shouldn’t surprise us. Nonetheless, based on the evidence we have now, it is likely that there are alien microbes floating freely in the Venusian atmosphere.

But this isn’t the news of the day. That we landed on the surface of Venus 45 years ago is, on the other hand.

Venera, the spacecraft that landed on Venus

The surface of Venus as seen by the Venera 9 probe. Image Credit: Roscosmos.
The surface of Venus as seen by the Venera 9 probe. Image Credit: Roscosmos.

Venera 9, to be more specific, successfully landed on the surface of Venus 45 years ago, in a historical moment in space exploration.

The lander of the Soviet space mission Venera-9 made a soft landing on the surface of Venus on October 22, 1975, transmitting the first images of its surface.

For the first time in the atmosphere of the planet, Venus at pressure 90 times higher than on Earth and a temperature of 485 degrees Celsius, a unique image of the surface of Venus was obtained at the landing site.

The spacecraft was able to transmit information for 53 minutes before succumbing to the enormous pressure and heat, Roscosmos reports.

The very first images of the Venusian surface, snapped by the Venera 9 and 9 probes on 22 and 25 October 1975. Image Credit: Roscosmos.
The very first images of the Venusian surface, snapped by the Venera 9 and 9 probes on 22 and 25 October 1975. Image Credit: Roscosmos.

For the first time, panoramic television images of another planet were broadcast.

In these striking images, bedrock outcrops and fragmented rocks were visible, lying in the distance of the Venusian landscape. These features are likely the result of displacement in the crust and serve as a confirmation of tectonic activity on Venus.

Venera’s mission to Venus was unprecedented and helped revealed a plethora of previously unknown information about the planet.

The descent vehicle measured the density, pressure, temperature of the atmosphere, the amount of water vapor and performed nephelometric measurements of cloud particles, as well as measurements of illumination in different parts of the spectrum.

A close-up image of the rocks on the surface of Venus as seen by the Venera mission. This image was taken on February 28, 1976. Image Credit: Roscosmos.
A close-up image of the rocks on the surface of Venus as seen by the Venera mission. This image was taken on February 28, 1976. Image Credit: Roscosmos.

In addition to a gamma spectrometer, a radiation density meter was used to measure soil characteristics of the second planet from the sun.

Venera 9 also helped measure the surface luminosity, and these measurements showed that 5 to 10% of solar energy reaches the planet’s surface in the form of radiation scattered by clouds.

It was also possible to obtain images of the cloud layer, the distribution of the temperature along with the upper limit of the clouds, the spectra of the planet’s night brightness, and the mission was able to carry out studies of the hydrogen corona, multiple radio exposures of the atmosphere, and ionosphere, and make a measurement of magnetic fields and near-planetary plasma.

Roscosmos further revealed that in particular, the detection of thunderstorms and lightning in the planet’s cloud layer attracted a lot of attention.

The data from the optical measurements showed that the Venusian ray’s energetic characteristics are 25 times higher than the parameters of the Earth’s ray.


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Sources and references: Roscosmos / All other sources and references are linked throughout the article. If something doesn’t seem right, please let us know.

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